If a cup can hold 6.2 oz of water can i use that to measure a certain food of 6.2 oz?

Best answer: If you're going to be cooking you need some measuring tools.

Measuring spoons usually come in a cozy little nesting set of 4 individual spoons: 1 tbsp, 1 tsp, 1/2 tsp, 1/4 tsp. (tbsp = tablespoon. tsp = teaspoon. 1 tbsp = 3 tsp. 2 tsp = 1 ounce.) To measure something like flour or little seeds, you'd scoop up a measuring spoon full and and then use the flat edge of a knife to push off the part that is above the rim of the spoon. That's why the call it a level teaspoon of sugar, because you level the top off the get an accurate measurement.

And about ounces, 8 ounces = 1 c. c = cup. Measuring cups usually come in a nesting set of four, a lot like the spoons but much bigger. 1c, 1/2c, 1/3c, & 1/4c is the usual cups in a set. Use the cups the same way as the spoons; scoop up the ingredient and then level off the cup with the back of a knife.

There are also measuring cups with markings on the sides. If you can see through the cup it's pretty easy to use, but if it's hard to see the markings that's not so handy.

When we talk about "ounce" as a unit of measurement, remember that we are doing VOLUME measurement here, not weight measurement like when a baby weighs 8 pounds 3 ounces. If you're not sure what kind of ounces a recipe is referring to, weight or volume, then wait until you do know to go on.

Don't be afraid of cooking. You have to just dive right in a willingness to experiment and learn by doing. You're going to throw stuff away sometimes. That's OK. Maybe you have a neighbor with a dog?

4 Answer(s)

Oh dear..

A "cup" is an actual measurement. It's 8fl oz. Measuring cups for liquids have handles, to pour the measured ingredient. Measuring cups for dry ingredients have flat tops - the cup is filled to the top, not overflowing.

Liquid measuring cups and dry measuring cups aren't really interchangeable, although many people do.

I guess so

not necessarily.
it depends on if you are measuring weight or volume.
for example 1 cup of feathers will be much lighter than 1 cup of rocks.
8 ounces of feathers will be many many more feathers than 8 ounces of rocks if you weigh them.
What are you measuring?

If you're going to be cooking you need some measuring tools.

Measuring spoons usually come in a cozy little nesting set of 4 individual spoons: 1 tbsp, 1 tsp, 1/2 tsp, 1/4 tsp. (tbsp = tablespoon. tsp = teaspoon. 1 tbsp = 3 tsp. 2 tsp = 1 ounce.) To measure something like flour or little seeds, you'd scoop up a measuring spoon full and and then use the flat edge of a knife to push off the part that is above the rim of the spoon. That's why the call it a level teaspoon of sugar, because you level the top off the get an accurate measurement.

And about ounces, 8 ounces = 1 c. c = cup. Measuring cups usually come in a nesting set of four, a lot like the spoons but much bigger. 1c, 1/2c, 1/3c, & 1/4c is the usual cups in a set. Use the cups the same way as the spoons; scoop up the ingredient and then level off the cup with the back of a knife.

There are also measuring cups with markings on the sides. If you can see through the cup it's pretty easy to use, but if it's hard to see the markings that's not so handy.

When we talk about "ounce" as a unit of measurement, remember that we are doing VOLUME measurement here, not weight measurement like when a baby weighs 8 pounds 3 ounces. If you're not sure what kind of ounces a recipe is referring to, weight or volume, then wait until you do know to go on.

Don't be afraid of cooking. You have to just dive right in a willingness to experiment and learn by doing. You're going to throw stuff away sometimes. That's OK. Maybe you have a neighbor with a dog?